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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
pretty hard things well. one is to lead the pentagon out of afghanistan, lead our military into redefining itself as to what does it do? why do you serve in the post-post-9/11 era? second, lead the country in more defense spending cuts, which is coming. and third thing is really to lead the nation through a discussion of what's our military for in the post-post-9/11 era? what's the role of counterterrorism? what are the limits of counterterrorism? what are we doing in asia? how do we work with our allies in china and asia? where has the pentagon taken powers that maybe need to go back to the civilian agencies? those are three enormous jobs that require you to work well with congress, to work well with the defense industry, to be trusted with our men and women in uniform and to have a really close relationship with the president. that's a big job description. >> so if we paint this sort of job description as guiding the pentagon through that period, it sounds like reimagining. how do you see the strengths and weakness of the front runners? >> the first thing to say about sen
>> did the pentagon have review? >> no, didn't have fop once i'm retired from active due any i don't have to submit it to the pentagon unless i use classified information. so i avoided using any classified information but a lot of stuff was declassified right after the war. a lot of stuff was a matter of public record. so i had a great deal of material. the best thing i had was this, any war i ever fought most of instructions were sent by message back and forth. so you have hard copy record of every decision made. because of where we are today most of the orders and instructions are seventh back and forth by secured telephone. it became apparent that we're not going have a record of the decisions made unless we have a record ourselves. any time i had a conversation i wrote down what i said and what is being said to me. i had someone in there who would write down every time i made a decision and he would log it into a private journal that we kept of every decision that was happening during the war. if it had not been through that the book would not be written. >> where are those 3,0
. the increasing of taxes and the sequester, the across-the-board tax cuts that would affect both the pentagon and domestic programs. joining me now with an update, a re-set, if you will, chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel. mike? >> bret, good evening, once again. it has been an interesting day up here on capitol hill after that wide bipartisan vote in the united states senate we instantly heard grumblings this morning from house republicans who said they wanted to take time to read the bill. after they read the bill they did not like what they saw. they said where are the spending cuts. raise taxes $41 for are every dollar or so that we are going to save money. that didn't add up for them and so house republican leadership spent a whole lot of time today, two different meetings behind closed doors with the rank and file allowing the rank and file to vent about the deal and talk about a way toward. they talked about the possibility of doing an amendment eceptionly to try -- essentially to try to tack on spending cuts on to the existing bill and then send it back to the united state
.s. ambassador and three other americans were killed. our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is joining us now with the findings. >> this new report spreads the blame for that attack. blaming intel, state, even the pentagon to some degree, saying there was no plan in place to rescue americans there. a new senate report says the state department should have shut down the benghazi mission before the attack that killed four americans. it chastised officials for relying on local militia to guard the front gate. >> the terrorists essentially walked into the compound, virtually unimpeded. >> senators say the state department missed plenty of red flags. a rocket propelled glen nate hit the red cross in may. a bomb exploded in june. another rpg hit the british ambassador's convoy, prompting the uk to close its mission. senators questioned how much more the state department needed to see before officials realized they didn't have enough security. >> we've got to close this facility because we can't protect american personnel in benghazi. >> reporter: the report also condemned communication failures. li
. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another. i have met a lot of our men and women in the foreign services. we sat and talked about the work they do and the lives that they lead. they spent years learning the languages of the country so they can be on the fro
, but remember, the funding at the pentagon, without the wars, has doubled in the last ten years and it's a, you know, over 600 billion right now. so, 50 billion out of 600 billion, that's not even 10%. so, i really think we have is to keep perspective. these cuts aren't permanent, we can adjust them after the first of the year, i think we can make adjustments after the first of the year if we don't get a deal, still hopeful we get a deal if we don't, all of us know we can make adjustments. >> senator, thank you vet. i appreciate it. still hopeful, what senator mccaskill just said, martin, i can tell you, as i said, many of the colleagues coming out of the meeting, wrapped up right in there did not have that same assessment, see what happens, back to you. >> dana bash, thank you very much. >>> let's turn now to maine senator olympia snowe. she says it is time to talk about spending cuts and not limit the talk to just the tax hike question. senator snowe joins us now. let me start by asking, are you in favor, senator, of raising tax rates on anyone making more than $250,000 a year or are you more
, so do have the debt ceiling fight coming up. when you say that it faces and, you expect the pentagon to say we would just hold everything? certainly years, serving months ahead of time. they have to plan on how many people to have in their workforce -- in the force, recruiting. you cannot turn on a dime, like a huge oil tanker. >> john, we will focus on folks that we did not know who are here. we will come right back. don't go away. take five minutes. >> this is just -- >> we saw senators mccain and 11 decide they will come back in a couple of minutes. as we wait, back to something that took place earlier this morning outside the capital. -- the capitol. >> i want to thank you for being here to call on house republicans not to drop the ball on the middle-class. also for the house to show up for work, right? the president is down at the white house, senator harkin and his colleagues are here. they are out on a paid vacation right now. boehner walked out of the allegations with the present and then he walked out of the house and tell all members to go home while we are four days away f
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)